Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

The Oxford Invention Fund (OIF) has awarded Steve Taylor, Head of the Computational Biology Research Group, £27000 to build Zegami, a high throughput image centric analysis software tool, building on the HTML5 Pivot Viewer software (Taylor and Noble, 2014).
 
The OIF fund was devised to ensure that smart ideas will be developed to a stage where they can be transferred from the University to business.  It provides an opportunity for donors to support the development of technology in Oxford, and help secure the University’s innovative infrastructure.

Reference

Taylor S, Noble R. HTML5 PivotViewer: high-throughput visualization and querying of image data on the web. Bioinformatics. 2014 May 21. pii: btu349.

Similar stories

Hashem Koohy receives Turing Fellowship

Fellows are established scholars with proven research excellence in data science, artificial intelligence (AI), or a related field.

Changes in blood cell production over the human lifetime may hold clues to patterns of disease

A new paper published in Cell Reports reveals that changes in the gene expression of blood stem cells occur across the human lifetime; an important step in the understanding and treatment of blood disorders.

New Associate Professor appointments announced

Congratulations to Dr Bethan Psaila, Dr Benjamin Fairfax, Dr Hashem Koohy, Dr Andrew Blackford and Dr Oliver Bannard who have all been awarded the title of Associate Professor in recognition of their research achievements, contribution to teaching and contributions to the Medical Sciences Division.

Role-playing computer game helps players understand how vaccines work on a global scale

A free game launched today allows players to role-play the deployment of a virtual vaccine to help to halt the global spread of a viral pandemic.