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adrian_harris

Adrian Harris has received a grant from the new breast cancer charity, Breast Cancer NOW, which combines the previous breast cancer charities Breakthrough Breast Cancer and Breast Cancer Campaign.  The grant is to examine the function of a long non-coding RNA, NEAT1, induced by hypoxia, which helps assemble the nuclear structure known as a paraspeckle.  This can act as an assembly platform for transcription factors and represents a new mechanism for regulation of many genes in response to hypoxia. Intriguingly, it is regulated by HIF2α, rather than HIF1α, which is the predominant form of HIF in most cancers. The focus will be particularly on breast cancer, but it is relevant to many tumour types. 

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