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The mission of the MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine (WIMM) is to undertake internationally competitive research into the processes underlying normal cell and molecular biology and to determine the mechanisms by which these processes are perturbed in inherited and acquired human diseases. It is also our mission to translate this research to improve human health. The WIMM is uniquely placed among biomedical institutes throughout the world in its pioneering vision of combining outstanding clinical research with excellent basic science. The WIMM Faculty currently includes an equal mixture of scientists and clinicians working together and in collaboration with the National Institute of Health Research, the NHS and commercial companies with the aim of improving the diagnosis and treatment of human diseases. The major topics of current research include haematology, immunology, stem cell biology, oncology and inherited human genetic diseases. The Institute benefits from strategic support from the MRC.

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The Institute values communication with members of the broader scientific community and the general public and with the support of the Medical Research Council (MRC) we have commissioned three short videos to explain our mission.

News

Annual WIMM fundraiser raises over £1000 for urology cancer research

Annual WIMM fundraiser raises over £1000 for urology cancer research

Posted 10/07/2015

Every year in early summer, a team of dedicated volunteers at the WIMM put together a series of fund-raising activities in aid of a local charity, which is often chosen because the beneficiary has links to staff and students at the Institute. This year, the WIMM decided to support UCARE (Urology Cancer Research and Education), a charity based at the nearby Churchill Hospital in Oxford which aims to improve the treatment and care of patients ...

 

Breast Cancer NOW Grant Awarded

Breast Cancer NOW Grant Awarded

Posted 30/06/2015

Adrian Harris has received a grant from the new breast cancer charity, Breast Cancer NOW, which combines the previous breast cancer charities Breakthrough Breast Cancer and Breast Cancer Campaign.  The grant is to examine the function of a long non-coding RNA, NEAT1, induced by hypoxia, which helps assemble the nuclear structure known as a paraspeckle.  This can act as an assembly platform for transcription factors and represents a new mechanism ...

 News Archive

 

Vacancies

Personnel Assistant ref: 119449

Posted 23/07/2015

We are looking for a proactive and committed individual to join our team, to predominantly support the recruitment and pre-employment process. Duties will include maintaining the CoreHR system throughout the recruitment process, generating documentation and arranging interviews, complying with employment legislation and University procedures throughout. You will be educated to GCSE level with experience of working within a Personnel ...

Further Vacancies

WIMM Blog

How do you fix broken blood?

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© Wellcome Images

Congenital Dyserythropoietic Anaemia (CDA) is a rare disease that causes insufficient production of red blood cells. This means that the body is unable to carry enough oxygen around to its vital organs, resulting in dizziness, chest pain, tiredness and shortness of breath. In severe cases, patients are dependent on regular blood transfusions for life. In a subset of these patients, the underlying cause of how this disease is passed down from generation to generation remains elusive – but two grants recently award to scientists working in Veronica Buckle’s lab in the MRC MHU hope to help solve this problem.

WIMM Blog Archive