Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Recent medical advances have generated a doubling in life expectancy in the industrialized world. It is well documented that the elderly immune system is unable to fight off infections and fails to respond optimally to vaccinations, contributing to morbidity in old age. The reasons behind the decline of the immune system are not clear. Our hypothesis is that long-lived immune cells have developed a strict regime of waste disposal, called autophagy, that becomes less efficient with age. Autophagy removes obsolete organelles and proteins, preventing, cellular damage or death. We aim to identify cellular pathways that control longevity, which is a central goal in stem cell and cancer biology. We aim to develop novel drugs that rejuvenate stem cells and other long-lived cells such as memory cells via autophagy.

Similar stories

Spin-out company Alethiomics launches

The enterprise will focus on developing targeted therapies for a specific family of blood cancers.

Study links the onset of circulation to changes in metabolism affecting blood stem cell development

A new paper published in Cell Reports by the de Bruijn Group indicates that the onset of circulation triggers a metabolic switch associated with the maturation of haematopoietic stem cells.

Mohsin Badat receives ASH-BSH Abstract Achievement Award

Dr Mohsin Badat, a Clinical Training Research Fellow from the Higgs and Davies Groups has been awarded the ASH-BSH Abstract Achievement Award by the American Society of Haematology and the British Society of Haematology.

New model for infant leukaemia announced

The breakthrough could lead to development of new treatments for infant Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia.

Study reveals ‘stop-eating’ response to DNA damage

A new study from the Patel Group sheds light on the mechanism by which DNA damage suppresses appetite, a finding with implications for understanding the appetite lowering side-effects of chemotherapy.