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The British Society for Developmental Biology medal recognises outstanding achievements in the field.

Associate Professor Tatjana Sauka-Spengler is this year's winner of the Cheryll Tickle medal, which is awarded annually to the mid-career female scientist for outstanding achievements in the developmental biology research. 

Professor Sauka-Spengler has been a research group leader in the MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine (WIMM) since 2012, and she has also previously won the prestigious Lister Institute Research Prize (2013) and the March of Dimes Basil O’Connor Research Award (2013).

Dr. Filipa Simões  from Professor Sauka-Spengler's group said: “Simply put, Tatjana is an outstanding supervisor and mentor, not only to the people directly working with her, but also to any other junior scientist that approaches her for guidance”. 

Professor Sauka-Spengler said: "I am absolutely delighted but also very humbled by this honour. I am grateful to all my fantastic students, postdocs, my collaborator and mentors and my institutions MRC WIMM, RDM and University of Oxford - I think I am extremely lucky to work with such a brilliant group of people."

Many congratulations to Professor Sauka-Spengler!

Read more on the British Society of Developmental Biology website. 

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