Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Congratulations to Prof Jacobsen, who was elected member of the Academy's Class for Medical Sciences.

Sten Eirik Waelgaard Jacobsen is Bass Professor of Developmental and Stem Cell Biology at the MRC Molecular Haematology Unit at the University of Oxford, and Professor of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine at the Department of Medicine Huddinge and the Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institutet.

“I feel very honored to be elected to the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences by prominent research colleagues whom I respect highly, and whom I now look forward to working with through the Academy of Sciences. The appointment also represents a recognition of research from so many talented young researchers and valuable collaborative contributions for several years, at the University of Lund, the University of Oxford and Karolinska Institutet.”, says Sten Eirik Waelgaard Jacobsen.

Similar stories

Project funding for personalised childhood cancer treatments

Funding from the Azaylia Foundation will support the Scientific Advances for Infant Leukaemia (SAIL) programme.

MRC National Mouse Genetics Network Research Clusters Announced

Claus Nerlov and Steve Twigg from the MRC WIMM join the new national network for disease modelling.

RDM announces new Principal Investigators

Dr Stephen Twigg has been announced as one of eight new Principal Investigators by the Radcliffe Department of Medicine.

Patient priorities guide Oxford Myeloma research

Medical staff in Oxford are partnering closely with Myeloma patients to help set priorities for future research.

From ‘Ew, gross!’ to ‘Wow!’: Scientists bring immunology to the classroom

For British Science Week, members of the MRC WIMM visited a local Oxfordshire primary school for an interactive science day – one of the first of its kind since the start of the pandemic.