Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.
Dr Hannah Long who recently obtained her DPhil from Rob Klose and Roger Patient's lab has been awarded a prestigious Sir Henry Wellcome Postdoctoral Fellowship.  This fellowship provides a unique opportunity for the most promising newly qualified postdoctoral researchers to make an early start in developing their independent research careers, working in the best research environments in the UK and overseas.  Candidates will be expected to identify an important biomedical research question and to develop and deliver a personal programme to achieve their research aims.
hannah_long

Hannah will work with supervision from Doug Higgs (WIMM), Joannah Wysocka (Stanford) and Stanley Qi (UCSF) to study long-range gene regulation of gene expression in the neural crest. 

Similar stories

Spin-out company Alethiomics launches

The enterprise will focus on developing targeted therapies for a specific family of blood cancers.

Study links the onset of circulation to changes in metabolism affecting blood stem cell development

A new paper published in Cell Reports by the de Bruijn Group indicates that the onset of circulation triggers a metabolic switch associated with the maturation of haematopoietic stem cells.

Mohsin Badat receives ASH-BSH Abstract Achievement Award

Dr Mohsin Badat, a Clinical Training Research Fellow from the Higgs and Davies Groups has been awarded the ASH-BSH Abstract Achievement Award by the American Society of Haematology and the British Society of Haematology.

New model for infant leukaemia announced

The breakthrough could lead to development of new treatments for infant Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia.

Study reveals ‘stop-eating’ response to DNA damage

A new study from the Patel Group sheds light on the mechanism by which DNA damage suppresses appetite, a finding with implications for understanding the appetite lowering side-effects of chemotherapy.