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Congratulations to Professor Graham Ogg and Associate Professor Tatjana Sauka-Spengler – the first recipients of the Radcliffe Department of Medicine (RDM) Awards for Excellent Supervision. The Awards were presented at the RDM Symposium on Monday 19 March 2018.

Professor Ogg (MRC Human Immunology Unit, MRC HIU) has supervised a large number of DPhil students and postdocs in recent years. Despite having a large group, he was recognised as always having time to meet people and provide prompt and excellent feedback. He helps members of his team to prepare for talks, seminars and assessments, generously devoting his time, despite being busy. More than one member of his team commented on his incredible enthusiasm and optimism. Even when lab members are struggling with their projects, they can go into a meeting with Graham feeling despondent about their research and come out beaming, feeling inspired and encouraged to continue.

Professor Sauka-Spengler, Associate Professor of Genome Biology, inspires her group with her passion for science. She pushes her team hard, with several team members commenting that they have achieved more than they thought capable. In addition, she is able to adjust her supervision style to the needs of the student/postdoc and the stage of the project. Tatjana offers additional guidance in the early stages, before standing back a bit more to allow people to achieve independence in their research. While she is highly driven by the science, she combines this with a genuine interest in the careers and lives of members of her group.

Another MRC WIMM member, Associate Professor Jan Rehwinkel (MRC HIU) was commended for his excellent work in supervising his students and postdocs.

We are delighted to have such fantastic supervisors as members of our Institute!

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