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Richard Cornall from the MRC Human Immunology Unit has been elected as a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences.

44 new Fellows were elected to the Academy Fellowship following the Council meeting in April 2014. These distinguished medical scientists join the existing Fellows of the Academy to bring the total membership to 1134.

 

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