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Our two MRC-funded units, the MRC Human Immunology Unit and the MRC Molecular Haematology Unit, are taking part in the MRC Festival of Medical Research (17 to 23 June) – an annual celebration of cutting edge research.

We’ll be taking a road trip around supermarkets in Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire, with activities to discuss genetic susceptibility to common diseases with passing shoppers. Is eczema inherited? Why do I have anaemia? We will be seeking to answer these questions and more in our science road-show!

A big thank you to the researchers from each Unit who have developed the activities and all the volunteers who will be giving up their time to take our research out-and-about.

We'll be at the following locations over the week:

17 June Newbury Northbrook St
18 June High Wycombe Eden Shopping Centre
19 June Aylesbury Tesco Extra
20 June Banbury Morrison’s
21 June Bicester Tesco
22 June Witney Clock Tower
23 June Swindon Retail Outlet

Find out more about the Festival.

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