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A member of the Oxford Centre For Haematology, Dr Shapiro, was recently interviewed by the Royal College of Pathologists.

Headshot of Dr Susan Shapiro.

Following winning the Royal College of Pathologist’s Excellence Award a couple of years ago, Dr Susan Shapiro has given an interview about patient safety at the heart of the Oxford Anticoagulation Service. 

Susan is a consultant haematologist at Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, where she heads up the Oxford Haemophilia Service. The haemophilia specialist multidisciplinary team aims to support individuals to live the life they want to lead.

Susan received her award for leading an anticoagulation improvement project, and you can read the full interview on the Royal College of Pathologists' website.

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