Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Congratulations to Layal Liverpool, a student at the MRC Human Immunology Unit who was awarded a prestigious British Science Association (BSA) media fellowship.

Layal’s DPhil research, based in the lab of Prof. Jan Rehwinkel (Radcliffe Department of Medicine, MRC HIU), focuses on investigating how invading viruses are detected by the body’s immune system. Alongside her DPhil studies, Layal is also a passionate science communicator and is frequently involved in public engagement activities. In 2016, her short talks on HIV and flu landed her in the regional final of the science communication competition Fame Lab UK. In Layal’s own words “I believe that engaging the public with the research that we do is an important part of our job as scientists. The media provides a powerful public engagement tool because it enables a large and diverse audience to be reached.”

The BSA media fellowship funds scientists to spend 2-6 weeks working at a well-known media outlet during the summer of 2018. BSA Media Fellows are mentored by professional journalists and learn how the media operates and reports on science, how to communicate with the media and to engage the wider public with science through the media. Following their media placement, Fellows attend the British Science Festival in September, where they have the opportunity to gain valuable experience working in the BSA Press Centre alongside a range of media organisations from all over the UK. Layal’s fellowship has been funded by the Society for Applied Microbiology.

In response to being awarded the fellowship, Layal said “I am absolutely delighted and extremely grateful for this fantastic opportunity!”.

Similar stories

New Associate Professor appointments announced

Congratulations to Dr Bethan Psaila, Dr Benjamin Fairfax, Dr Hashem Koohy, Dr Andrew Blackford and Dr Oliver Bannard who have all been awarded the title of Associate Professor in recognition of their research achievements, contribution to teaching and contributions to the Medical Sciences Division.

Mechanism behind repair of cancer-inducing mutations discovered

New Nature paper uncovers the precise mechanism behind how the BRCA1 protein detects and engages with DNA breaks in the genome, helping to prevent the development of breast and ovarian cancers.

DNA breakthrough could help identify why some people are more affected by Covid-19

Scientists from the MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine have developed a method that allows them to see, with far greater accuracy, how DNA forms large scale structures within a cell nucleus.

New clinical trial for patients affected by blood cancer

Radcliffe Department of Medicine's Professor Adam Mead is leading PROMise, a new clinical trial offering a novel treatment option for patients with a type of blood cancer called myelofibrosis.