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davidclynes

David Clynes, a post-doctoral scientist in Richard Gibbons' lab, has successfully been awarded a grant through the CNRS-Oxford Collaboration scheme.  The scheme aims to facilitate the development of new collaborations, between researchers at the two organisations.  David will use the funding to visit the Almouzni laboratory in Paris with the collaborative aim to study the dynamics of ATRX mediated histone deposition.

Of the award, David said 'this offers a very exciting opportunity to build collaborations between the WIMM and another world leading research organisation and using cutting edge techniques developed in the Almouzni laboratory, we are excited to enhance our understanding of the temporal dynamics of ATRX mediated histone deposition'.

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