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Many congratulations to Christopher Booth (Mead/Jacobsen group) and Marieke Oudelaar (Hughes/Higgs group), who won this year’s Radcliffe Department of Medicine Graduate Prize.


Chris Booth completed his DPhil under the supervision of Adam Mead and Sten Eirik Jacobsen. Chris led a study that provided experimental evidence that the phenotypic and gene expression profiles of a cancer can be traced back to those of the cell of origin. For the first time since the identification of human early thymic progenitor (ETP) leukemia, Chris confirmed that ETPs do indeed possess the potential to become LSCs upon introduction of recurrent ETP leukemia associated mutations. Chris published his findings in a first author article in Cancer Cell and has given oral presentations of his work at two international meetings. Find out more his work

 

 

Marieke Oudelaar completed her DPhil under the supervision of Doug Higgs and Jim Hughes. Her research describing chromosomal interactions within single cells has made a major contribution to recent developments in the application of Chromosome Conformation Capture techniques. Although this won’t have an immediate clinical application, it will, in time have a very large impact on the field. Marieke’s research is published in Nature Genetics. Find out more about her work. 

 

Find out more about the prize on the RDM website.

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