Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Today marks the launch of a new Oxford-wide initiative – the Oxford Centre for Haematology (OCH).

This virtual Centre aims to promote integration between academic and clinical haematology programmes in the University and Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and thereby capitalise on scientific opportunities to transform our understanding of haematopoiesis and blood diseases, with the goal of radically improving patient care.

The OCH will be led by Prof Paresh Vyas, a member of the MRC Molecular Haematology Unit based at the MRC WIMM, and several of the centre’s members are based at our Institute.

OCH builds on over 40 years of haematology research excellence in Oxford. From the pioneering work on globins led by our founder Professor Sir David Weatherall, Prof John Clegg and Prof Doug Higgs, through to our current position of driving the largest blood cancer clinical trials program in the UK, Oxford is truly a powerhouse of haematology research. OCH will build on, and enhance, our understanding of blood cancers, ageing of the haematopoietic system and the links with inflammation and immunity. The Centre will also raise new funding for research, trials and implementation into clinical practice, alongside training the next generation of scientists and healthcare professionalsand encouraging partnerships.

Establishing the Centre has been made possible thanks to funding from the NIHR Oxford Biomedical Research Centre and will be hosted by RDM, embedded within the Nuffield Division of Clinical Laboratory Sciences.

More information can be found here and all are invited to attend the OCH Inaugural Symposium on the 26 March.

Please direct any questions about OCH to Julie Stevens,whose desk is based in the WIMM’s Administration Office.

Similar stories

Mechanism behind repair of cancer-inducing mutations discovered

New Nature paper uncovers the precise mechanism behind how the BRCA1 protein detects and engages with DNA breaks in the genome, helping to prevent the development of breast and ovarian cancers.

DNA breakthrough could help identify why some people are more affected by Covid-19

Scientists from the MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine have developed a method that allows them to see, with far greater accuracy, how DNA forms large scale structures within a cell nucleus.

New clinical trial for patients affected by blood cancer

Radcliffe Department of Medicine's Professor Adam Mead is leading PROMise, a new clinical trial offering a novel treatment option for patients with a type of blood cancer called myelofibrosis.

Immune cells imperfect at distinguishing friend from foe

When it comes to distinguishing a healthy cell from an infected one that needs to be destroyed, the immune system’s killer T cells sometimes make mistakes. This discovery, described today in the journal eLife, upends a long-held belief among scientists that T cells were nearly perfect at discriminating friend from foe. The results may point to new ways to treat autoimmune diseases that cause the immune system to attack the body, or lead to improvements in cutting-edge cancer treatments.

Professor Graham Ogg elected Academy of Medical Sciences Fellow

Fellows are selected for their exceptional contributions to the advancement of medical science through innovative research discoveries and translating scientific developments into benefits for patients and the wider society.