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Today marks the launch of a new Oxford-wide initiative – the Oxford Centre for Haematology (OCH).

This virtual Centre aims to promote integration between academic and clinical haematology programmes in the University and Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and thereby capitalise on scientific opportunities to transform our understanding of haematopoiesis and blood diseases, with the goal of radically improving patient care.

The OCH will be led by Prof Paresh Vyas, a member of the MRC Molecular Haematology Unit based at the MRC WIMM, and several of the centre’s members are based at our Institute.

OCH builds on over 40 years of haematology research excellence in Oxford. From the pioneering work on globins led by our founder Professor Sir David Weatherall, Prof John Clegg and Prof Doug Higgs, through to our current position of driving the largest blood cancer clinical trials program in the UK, Oxford is truly a powerhouse of haematology research. OCH will build on, and enhance, our understanding of blood cancers, ageing of the haematopoietic system and the links with inflammation and immunity. The Centre will also raise new funding for research, trials and implementation into clinical practice, alongside training the next generation of scientists and healthcare professionalsand encouraging partnerships.

Establishing the Centre has been made possible thanks to funding from the NIHR Oxford Biomedical Research Centre and will be hosted by RDM, embedded within the Nuffield Division of Clinical Laboratory Sciences.

More information can be found here and all are invited to attend the OCH Inaugural Symposium on the 26 March.

Please direct any questions about OCH to Julie Stevens,whose desk is based in the WIMM’s Administration Office.

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