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Medical Sciences Division is delighted to welcome Dr Anjan Thakurta to Oxford, having now taken up his position of Visiting Professor of Cancer, Biology and Translational Science within the Radcliffe Department of Medicine.

Dr Thakurta will provide strategic support and advice to the Medical Sciences Division and foster new collaborations between the University of Oxford and Celgene. He will also facilitate greater access to and opportunities with senior Celgene scientists for University of Oxford researchers, enabling them to gain a deeper understanding of the scope and potential of Celgene’s portfolio of work and an industry perspective on research questions. Whilst in Oxford, Dr Thakurta will be based in the MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine (MRC WIMM).

Dr Thakurta brings extensive knowledge of Celgene’s early therapeutic pipeline and translational biology programmes, especially in haematology / oncology, and over 20 years’ experience in translational and clinical drug development. Most recently, leading the myeloma disease team, one of Celgene’s major disease areas. Prior to this, he led translational and diagnostic work across all haematological areas in Celgene.

Dr Thakurta brings with him a wealth of experience in mentoring scientists in the early stages of their careers, and has previously supervised Oxford-Celgene fellows.  His advice on Oxford-Celgene Fellowship Programme applications will not only support the development of cutting-edge science, but also the training of the next generation of scientists and clinical academics.

 

As Visiting Professor, I will visit Oxford regularly, interact with current and potential future fellows and look forward to establishing some new and exciting collaborations and translational initiatives at the university over the next three years. - Dr Anjan Thakurta, Celgene

 

I am really pleased Dr Thakurta has been awarded the position of Visiting Professorship and has taken this up position. Dr Thakurta has a wealth of experience in drug development especially in haematological disease and has already mentored two young aspiring clinical academics, who have successfully started their independent careers in Oxford. He has also made important links with a number of Oxford groups and I am sure these new relationships will be enormously productive, helping to transform patient care as well as providing wonderful academic opportunities for Oxford University, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and Celgene - Professor Paresh Vyas, Professor of Haematology, MRC Molecular Haematology Unit, MRC WIMM, University of Oxford

 

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