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paresh_vyas

Prof Paresh Vyas has just been awarded a Grant from Leukaemia and Lymphoma Research  - A first-in-human, first-in-class Phase I dose escalation trial of Humanized Anti-CD47 Monoclonal Antibody Hu5F9-G4 in Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML).

Paresh says – “Leukaemia and Lymphoma Research is one of the biggest charitable funders of haematology research in the UK.  They have awarded the MRC Molecular Haematology Unit a grant of £300 000 to conduct a first-in-class first in man clinical trial of a novel immunotherapeutic monoclonal antibody, directed against the cell surface protein CD47, to treat patients with relapsed/refractory Acute Myeloid Leukaemia.  This is an innovative therapeutic that aims to harness the body’s own immune system to fight cancer.  The work is a an exciting collaboration with the Oxford Early Phase Oncology Clinical Trials Unit, Stanford University and the UK AML Clinical Trials Group.“

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