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Congratulations to Dr Erdinc Sezgin, who will be part of the prestigious SciLifeLab Fellowship programme and the Karolinska Institutet.

Formerly a member of the Eggeling lab at MRC HIU, Erdinc will lead the Cell Signalling, Immunity and Nanoimaging Lab (CSI:Nano), working on biophysical and physicochemical aspects of cell signalling using advanced technologies in imaging and synthetic biology.

The SciLifeLab Fellows program is a career program aimed at strengthening Swedish research in Molecular Biosciences and supporting a long-term societal impact. The Sezgin group is specifically hosted by the Karolinska Institutet. The host universities provide an advantageous economic starting package and together with SciLifeLab, a strong interdisciplinary research environment in close proximity to a cutting-edge research infrastructure.

SciLifeLab, Science for Life Laboratory, was founded in 2010 as a joint effort between four universities: Karolinska Institutet, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm University and Uppsala University. Today, they support research activities at all major Swedish universities.

We wish all the best to Erdinc in his future endeavours. More information about the Sezgin group can be found here.

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