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Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) contribute to host defence and tissue repair but can induce immunopathology. Recent work has revealed tissue-specific roles for ILCs; however, the question of how a small population has large effects on immune homeostasis remains unclear. We identify two mechanisms that ILC3s utilise to exert their effects within intestinal tissue. ILC-driven colitis depends on production of granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), which recruits and maintains intestinal inflammatory monocytes. ILCs present in the intestine also enter and exit cryptopatches in a highly dynamic process. During colitis, ILC3s mobilize from cryptopatches, a process that can be inhibited by blocking GM-CSF, and mobilization precedes inflammatory foci elsewhere in the tissue. Together these data identify the IL-23R/GM-CSF axis within ILC3 as a key control point in the accumulation of innate effector cells in the intestine and in the spatio-temporal dynamics of ILCs in the intestinal inflammatory response.

Original publication

DOI

10.7554/eLife.10066

Type

Journal article

Journal

Elife

Publication Date

18/01/2016

Volume

5

Keywords

colitis, human, immunology, innate lymphoid cells, live imaging, mouse, mucosal immunology, Colitis, Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor, Humans, Immunity, Innate, Interleukin-23 Subunit p19, Intestines, Lymphocytes