Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

A new study led by Radcliffe Department of Medicine researchers analyses iron levels in COVID-19 intensive care patients to find that patients with very low levels of iron had severe respiratory failure.

The study, published in the journal Critical Care, is part of an ongoing close collaboration between ICU academic clinicians Dr Akshay Shah and Dr Stuart McKechnie, and Professor Hal Drakesmith’s research group at the MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine.

Changes in iron levels have been associated with worsening disease for other viral infections such as HIV and Hepatitis C, but this is the first study to find a similar link for COVID-19.

Iron is essential for the growth of pathogens, but also for the body’s own immune response. So during an infection, the immune system ‘sequesters’ iron to deprive pathogens. At the same time, the immune system’s T and B lymphocytes (white blood cells that are a key art of the body’s immune response) need iron to clear the infection.

Read more on the Radcliffe Department of Medicine website