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WIMM staff members Kevin Clark and Erdinc Sezgin have been awarded second place in the RDM Image Competition 2015 for their entries in the Non-Scientific and Scientific Image categories respectively. This fantastic achievement represents great skill in using photography and microscopy to illustrate scientific research.

Erdinc Sezgin
The image shows the vesicles derived from cell membrane. These vesicles as called Giant Plasma Membrane Vesicles are the cutting-edge of the model membrane field due to their perfect resemblance to the cell membrane. The images were taken with a confocal microscope and combined to a 3-D projection.

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Kevin Clark
The photograph shows the violet, blue, yellow/green and red lasers of a Becton Dickinson Aria Fusion Flow Cytometer. They are focussed on a series of prisms (on the right) before entering a flow cell where they cause passing cells to fluoresce so we can identify those of interest. Dry ice vapour was blown in to the beams during a long exposure photograph in order to see them.

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