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Today, 11 February, is International Day of Women and Girls in Science. To mark this occasion, the University of Oxford asked researchers to share their words of inspiration and encouragement with the next generation of women and girls. Three MRC WIMM researchers participated in this initiative:

 

“I would like to encourage you to follow your interests and take the leap into something that you are curious about, no matter how difficult it may seem at the start!”

Danuta Jeziorska (pictured above), Senior Postdoctoral Researcher in the Higgs lab (MRC Molecular Haematology Unit)

Danuta JeziorskaI have always been fascinated by life sciences, but a real important moment for me was finding out in high school that each cell of every living organism on Earth has an instruction manual, the DNA, that encodes the information required to build and maintain a whole organism. Curiosity for how things work at a molecular level have driven my whole career, and I now research how information in the DNA is read during blood cell formation, and how errors in this process contribute to disease.

Curiosity for science, knowledge and understanding led me to where I am right now. I would like to encourage you to follow your interests and take the leap into something that you are curious about, no matter how difficult it may seem at the start!

 

“My message to young girls is that science is for everyone, including you!”

Layal Liverpool, DPhil student in the Rehwinkel lab (MRC Human Immunology Unit)

layal-liverpoolWorking in scientific research means working in the exciting business of discovery. As a scientist, any discovery you make, however small, is important because it contributes to an accumulating knowledge base. I believe that good science is dependent on diversity. This means diversity of ideas, diversity of scientific methods and, most importantly, diversity amongst the people who are actually doing the science. My message to young girls is that science is for everyone, including you!

 

 

 

"You are all out there. Share your experiences to inspire and be inspired.”

Mira Kassouf, Senior Postdoctoral Researcher in the Higgs lab (MRC Molecular Haematology Unit)

mira-kassoufPassion for discovery, intellectual prowess, perseverance and focus are scientists’ qualities and are blind to gender. Opportunities to discover and nurture those qualities should be accessible to all. As a research scientist, a champion for innovation and technology, and most importantly as a mother of two girls, I make it my mission to be involved in activities that contribute to offering opportunities to all, to share the challenges and triumphs of my journey with the people I can reach. I also strongly believe that we are not short of role models for Best mum, Best sister, Best wife, Best friend, Best partner. Perhaps we need to shift the focus and showcase women as Best academic, Best researcher, Best CEO, Best inventor, Best engineer. You are all out there. Share your experiences to inspire and be inspired.

 

Read all messages of inspiration in Medium and also on the video below:

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