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Golden star on black background - award photo.

Marieke Oudelaar portrait photo

Dr Marieke Oudelaar, a Junior Research Fellow from the Higgs Group and Hughes Group, has been awarded one of the prestigious Lise Meitner Excellence Program grants - a new initiative from the Max Planck Society to recruit and promote exceptionally qualified female scientists. The grants are awarded to researchers at a very early stage in their scientific careers who are future stars within their field.

In recent years at the MRC WIMM, Marieke’s research has focused on the mechanisms by which regulatory elements of the genome control tissue-specific gene expression patterns. Marieke will start her own independent research group in the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry in Göttingen. We congratulate her on this award and wish her the best of luck in her new venture.

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