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At the MRC WIMM, MRC HIU and MRC MHU we value public engagement. We believe that sharing our science and working with the wider community improves the quality of scientific research.

Below are some of the ways that researchers across our Institute work to inform, involve and inspire others with science. From research spotlights to dance collaborations and school workshops, our researchers are constantly exploring impactful ways to share their work.

Our engagement work would not be possible without the passion and creativity of our community and external partners. We would like to acknowledge everyone who has helped to make these projects happen.

If you are interested in working with us on a future engagement project and would like to find out more, please email public.engagement@imm.ox.ac.uk

Three DPhil student volunteers from the MRC WIMM playing with slime at Freeland CE Primary School. From left to right: Grace Meaker (Wilkinson group); Norah Alrishedan (Bodmer group); Maya Pidoux (Dong group). © MRC WIMM
Microphone © Unsplash/Robinson Recalde
A medical professional with their finger on top of a wooden block that reads 'Fe'. © Shutterstock/CeltStudio
Graham Ogg photo
Visual representation of DNA sequencing. © Shutterstock/ktsdesign
Lauren shadowed PhD student Anne-Marie in the Blackford group
© Erdinc Sezgin
A yellow background with decorative images. In the top left hand corner is the logo for the Oxford Blood Group. In the top right hand corner is the logo for the University of Oxford. In the centre is written 'Racism and Sickle Cell Disorder: How race and racism impact quality of care for people in the SCD community and how we can change things for the better.'
Post-it notes and pen. © Unsplash/Ravi Palwe
A network of people are shown, with connections. © Shutterstock/Mirexon
Three speakers on stage at the Cheltenham Science Festival 2022. © Rosie Massey
© Peter Canning
MRC WIMM researchers at the University of Oxford engage the public at the Oxford Science and Ideas Festival 2018
© Shutterstock
This public engagement activity shows how DNA is folded into a nucleus. © MRC WIMM
Post-it notes and pen. © Unsplash/Ravi Palwe
MRC WIMM Researchers at the Royal Institution Fun Day, February 2019
Book © Shutterstock/Singleline
For each individual, the coloured symbol representing the genetic cluster to which an individual is assigned is plotted at the mean position of their grandparents’ birthplaces. Cluster names are in the side bar. Contains OS data © Crown copyright and database right 2012. © EuroGeographics for some administrative boundaries.
For each individual, the coloured symbol representing the genetic cluster to which an individual is assigned is plotted at the mean position of their grandparents’ birthplaces. Cluster names are in the side bar. Contains OS data © Crown copyright and database right 2012. © EuroGeographics for some administrative boundaries.
© Shutterstock/ tomertu
© Shutterstock/ tomertu
Early Earth (left): 4 billion years ago, in the absence of oxygen, iron was soluble in water, and supported the initiation of simple life.
Later Earth (right): Abundant oxygen means that iron is insoluble in water and scarcely available. The need to acquire and utilise iron more efficiently may have driven evolution of complex life. © Image courtesy of Mark A. Garlick / markgarlick.com
Multi channel pipette loading biological samples in microplate for test in the laboratory © Shutterstock/angellodeco
Microscopy image of acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

Are you a current MRC WIMM member and keen to get involved? Check out the Public Engagement Section on the internal pages.